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Active engine collectors

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Active engine collectors
« on: February 05, 2009, 05:57:03 PM »
Just wondering how many engine collectors are viewing this forum.

I know that Dave Ernst and I look at it, but I haven't noticed anyone else in a long long time.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2009, 08:40:10 PM »
I have about 5 old engines but don't consider myself an engine collector. I much prefer old tractors.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2009, 04:29:25 PM »
John,

I've had both for as long as I've been in the hobby.  Started out with a lot more tractors, then regrettably I sold all my early tractors and got more into the engine side of the hobby.

Now I can't afford any of the early tractors that I really like.:(

Active engine collectors
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2009, 08:00:32 AM »
Yep, the price of early tractors is running away. Can't decide how much of it is real and how much is just those models catching up from being ignored in the '90's while everybody rushed to buy 40's and 50's models you could go to the dealership and buy parts for.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2009, 08:37:59 AM »
Question:

Could someone clarify for me what we consider early tractors?  Would it be pre 1940, pre 1930, back in the teens?  This will help get my thoughts in line with this thread. When I took a 1930 McDr. 10-20 to a parade a couple of years age, many along the route shouted "What Year?".  Many had not seen a hand crank model before.  That can be a culture shock to those of us who grew up with these models.

Thank you,

Charlie V.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2009, 04:32:39 PM »
For me an early tractor is pre 1940 although I prefer pre 1930. Kind of like engine collectors that only prefer open crank hit-and-miss as opposed to the later styles with throttle and govenor and closed cranks. Glad to see you exhibiting that 10-20--they have a really great sound.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2009, 08:21:39 PM »
Thanks, John.  That parallels my thoughts.

Charlie V.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2009, 03:37:05 PM »
To me the early tractors are the steel wheeled tractors.
When I first got in the hobby I thought anything with rubber tires was too new.

In the beginning I also used to go to a few shows and thought the show was pretty bad if there weren't more steel wheeled tractors than rubber tired ones.

While these days you see very few steel wheeled tractors at some of the shows.  Plus some shows don't even like you to have a tractor with steel lugs unless you unload it from a trailer into the display spot and don't drive it aroung.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2009, 04:56:12 PM »
I too started collecting tractors first. I soon discovered that Stationary Engines are more fun to display at shows. Engines draw crowds and start people talking, where tractors are heavy to transport to the shows and just don't excite crowds unless they are plowing,disking or belted to something. Merton from Eastern North Carolina

Active engine collectors
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2009, 09:29:04 PM »
Quote from: Merton;514
I too started collecting tractors first. I soon discovered that Stationary Engines are more fun to display at shows. Engines draw crowds and start people talking, where tractors are heavy to transport to the shows and just don't excite crowds unless they are plowing,disking or belted to something. Merton from Eastern North Carolina

I wonder if the crowd you are drawing is related to your location. I always see primarily tractors in eastern NC shows. Head to the mountains and it is just about all engines. The tractors in eastern NC tend to be larger models also.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2009, 04:32:30 PM »
Glad to see your posts, Merton and George.  Your posts reminded me of a really nice engine set up I saw on display in Alexander NY a couple of years ago. The engine ran the merry go round and the couple with the display had it set up ever so neat.  I will try to attach the pictures that I have of it.

Charlie V.

Active engine collectors
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2009, 09:43:33 AM »
The difference between modern and old to me is a battery.............
Dave E

Active engine collectors
« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2009, 09:47:13 AM »
Quote from: Charlie V;510
Question:

Could someone clarify for me what we consider early tractors?  Would it be pre 1940, pre 1930, back in the teens?  This will help get my thoughts in line with this thread. When I took a 1930 McDr. 10-20 to a parade a couple of years age, many along the route shouted "What Year?".  Many had not seen a hand crank model before.  That can be a culture shock to those of us who grew up with these models.

Thank you,

Charlie V.


The difference between modern and old to me is a battery.............
Dave E

Active engine collectors
« Reply #13 on: February 13, 2009, 03:07:41 PM »
Quote from: John Hall;516
I wonder if the crowd you are drawing is related to your location. I always see primarily tractors in eastern NC shows. Head to the mountains and it is just about all engines. The tractors in eastern NC tend to be larger models also.


I think it may be supply and demand law at work here in Eastern North Carolina. Here in Eastern North Carolina most Farms didn't get tractors until the end of WWII. Engines date mostly before WWII and what few that were purchased for use in my area were junked or are already in collector's hands. Most of my engine have come from outside of this area. Merton

Engines or tractors
« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2009, 10:25:03 PM »
I have 18 engines and 6 tractors. I think I am partial to engines though.
My main interest is in Butt Buggys powered by old engines. They work well in the parades as do the tractors. All my ButtBuggys and parade tractors have two seats.....gotta have a place for my bride to ride!
    "You are never to old to have a happy childhood!!"