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Working the 730 Case

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Working the 730 Case
« on: July 12, 2011, 10:22:04 AM »
I was moving some grain yesterday and it happened that the 730 Case was the most likely candidate to run the pto grain auger. I didn't run it too hard as I am afraid the pto will slip . The 10x50 foot auger can make a small tractor work hard if I try to run the auger right full. This was a little more relaxed run, still fast moving grain though. [video=youtube;DxzNh4XyvuQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxzNh4XyvuQ[/video]
Ralph in Sask.

Working the 730 Case
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2011, 05:32:05 PM »
Nice to see the 730 working. It is a pretty simple task to adjust the PTO clutch on these tractors. They will take all the power you can put to them .

Worked my 700 on the 9ft haybine yesterday and cut about 4 acres of hay. Finished just in time to get a 1/2 inch of rain on it. Next 5 days are forecast to be dry and a little cooler. These 90+ degree days are taking a toll on me.

Gene

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Working the 730 Case
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2011, 11:09:32 PM »
Gene, I am sure envious of your hay conditioner. I spent the afternoon in a haze of sneeze inducing pollen and bitten by hordes of mosquitos while trying to cut hay with the IH swather which does not do well in grass cutting. The pollen bothers me more every year, like a bad head cold  . I need to be in a good cab.
On the 730 pto, I did adjust it according to the procedure in the manual but it seems it has hit the limit. I can't get it to go any tighter. The lever does not have a good snap to it. On the 6 foot rotary mower I noticed the pto would slip when it got heavy going. I'm assuming the pto is at the limit of it's adjustment unless I am missing some detail.
Ralph in Sask.

Working the 730 Case
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2011, 06:36:56 AM »
Yes, the hay conditioner is a big improvement over the sickle mower. I mowed the entire 4 acres and never plugged once. Finally learned that to cut the backswath that I have to run in 2nd. gear. Rest of the cutting is done in 4th. Hay is very good crop 2nd cutting, almost all alfalfa. Nice to have a good crop. My worst problem cutting hay is the bugs that seem to have a liking for my ears. Don't know what the attraction is for them. I sometimes wear earplugs just to keep the bugs out.

The PTO clutch is pretty particular on the type oil. Original recommendation is ATF fluid. I still use it and have only had to adjust my clutch once in the 39 years I have owned the tractor. Still has a good snap and doesn't slip. Hardest use is on the baler though.

Gene

Working the 730 Case
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2011, 08:22:20 AM »
My worst problem cutting hay is the bugs that seem to have a liking for my ears.


Just a suggestion if you will allow me to put yet another bug in your ear, Gene.  (Ha Ha)  My zero has a questionable bearing or two in the deck and has more noise volume than normal. I finally became aware of noticeably more ringing in my ears for a day or two after mowing.  (The ringing started many years ago when I was on a range with M1  'S without protection.)  This ringing prompted me to get into my trap shooting bag and get out the ear muff type protectors.  (Twenty some bucks for an O.K. pair.)  I now always wear the muffs while mowing.  I find a two fold advantage.  The ringing does not occur and I do not have to put sun blocker on my flaps to protect from melanoma.  I am usually a 'to heck with it guy"  but find the small discomfort from the ear muffs is well worth tolerating.

Charlie V.

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Working the 730 Case
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2011, 10:11:09 AM »
Charlie, I'd agree on the hearing protection. I've worn the foam ear plugs for years and they do make a big difference. Even in the newer quiet cabs. After a long day my hearing is just as good as when I first got into the tractor. The odd time I forget the ear plugs I can sure tell. Can't hear the radio as well and slight ringing in the ears at the end of the day. Foam ear plugs are cheap, easy to carry and no discomfort. Unlike the heavy ear muffs that I have. The ear muffs are effective but I find after a little while they get really uncomfortable, especially since I wear glasses. I've seen too many of the previous generation in my own family that lost a lot of their hearing and don't want to end up that way myself.
Ralph in Sask.

Working the 730 Case
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2011, 11:40:26 AM »
Quote from: Charlie V;1553
My worst problem cutting hay is the bugs that seem to have a liking for my ears.


Just a suggestion if you will allow me to put yet another bug in your ear, Gene.  (Ha Ha)  My zero has a questionable bearing or two in the deck and has more noise volume than normal. I finally became aware of noticeably more ringing in my ears for a day or two after mowing.  (The ringing started many years ago when I was on a range with M1  'S without protection.)  This ringing prompted me to get into my trap shooting bag and get out the ear muff type protectors.  (Twenty some bucks for an O.K. pair.)  I now always wear the muffs while mowing.  I find a two fold advantage.  The ringing does not occur and I do not have to put sun blocker on my flaps to protect from melanoma.  I am usually a 'to heck with it guy"  but find the small discomfort from the ear muffs is well worth tolerating.

Charlie V.

Charlie

I do believe in hearing protectoin also. Always wear headsets when flying. When doing heavy work with the 700, the sound is pretty loud. Years ago I niticed that when I finished a long day on the tractor that when I came home that I was edgy and irritable for some time. I started wearing the foam earplugs and from then on the fatigue and irritability was much less. Bought a 9MM pistol this spring and decided after the first shot that protection was necessary when shooting it. Just used the foam plugs and all was fine. When cutting hay the tractor is only running at half throttle, so the noise level is pretty low. Only run at 1200 RPM. Dratted bugs have always seemed to have a liking for my ears and drives me batty when one gets in there.

Gene

Working the 730 Case
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2011, 08:25:45 PM »
Is the 730 a wheatland model.  I am not used to fenders like those.  Or maybe it is just the model year??

Paul

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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2011, 10:14:43 AM »
Quote from: pwaugh;1610
Is the 730 a wheatland model.  I am not used to fenders like those.  Or maybe it is just the model year??

Paul


Its definitely a wheatland or western model 730 (732) Paul. Thats about the only style we see here. They kept those big red round fenders til about 1965 or so when they changed the styling to the yellow "square fenders" like the 930 I had in later years. This 730 is a 1963 model that my Uncle bought in 64.
Ralph in Sask.

Working the 730 Case
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2011, 10:48:10 PM »
Well, Ralph, time to get something going on this thread. Been too long since we had a response.

The 400, 700 and 730 western style tractors are some of the easiest tractors to mount and dismount. A friend had a 400 standard that was probably one of the best tractors ever for square baling. They had one of the smoothest PTO clutches and running in oil, very seldom ever wore out. My 700 is great that way also, just harder to get on and off. The row crop is better because you can dismount to the front of the fenders away from the PTO. The lower 4 gears make it easy to match the field and crop conditions.

I have a 900 standard that I need to get in the shop and find the miss in #1 cylinder, then I can use it to plow with the 4 bottom 16 inch plow. No power steering though, but not bad in my long fields. Soon as the beans are off, the 700 will be on the plow.

Gene