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RG8800

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« on: March 15, 2015, 02:17:28 AM »
For those that might have missed it, here is a link to a youtube video of mine as I drive the 730 Case.
[video=youtube;_wBZZnqgRLw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wBZZnqgRLw[/video]
Ralph in Sask.

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« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2015, 06:41:05 AM »
Nice road trip on the 730. Had the 700 out for a chore this afternoon. Lower end of the drive washed out last year and had only partially repaired it. Had a lot of excess gravel at upper drive that was too coarse for the area, so scraped the top layer up into a pile I then used the dx24 loader tractor to haul it down and spread it at the washed out area. Worked out real well for the task. Will get a load of gravel brought in to coat the drive as soon as it gets dry enough to finish grading.

Gene

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« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2015, 11:51:51 AM »
Gene, I like that old 730 mostly because my Uncle bought it almost new in 1964 so it is a piece of family history . Only thing I wish it had power steering. That blade added to the front makes it even heavier.
Here is another video of mine. Spring planting with the MF disker and 2090 Case in spring of 1988.
[video=youtube;nk5rWTudmhg]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nk5rWTudmhg[/video]
Ralph in Sask.

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« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2015, 10:57:57 PM »
Another one, fresh off the camera showing today's attempt at starting an old flathead Mercury that has not run in over 30 years. This was my dad's car that he bought in 1961.
[video=youtube;NThsad0NOVQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NThsad0NOVQ[/video]
Ralph in Sask.

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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2015, 08:32:58 PM »
Couple more nice videos, Ralph. Discers were never used in this part of the country. Looks like it covered a pretty wide swath.

Took a couple pictures of tonight's sunset.

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Beautiful day here in Ohio today. Almost made it to 70 degrees, but a couple degrees short. Been outside most of the day. Ordered a load of stone to cover the driveway. Will be delivered tomorrow afternoon. Still have to do a little finishing before it gets here.

Gene

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RG8800

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« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2015, 10:37:29 AM »
Quote from: Gene Dotson;2623
Couple more nice videos, Ralph. Discers were never used in this part of the country. Looks like it covered a pretty wide swath.

Took a couple pictures of tonight's sunset.

Beautiful day here in Ohio today. Almost made it to 70 degrees, but a couple degrees short. Been outside most of the day. Ordered a load of stone to cover the driveway. Will be delivered tomorrow afternoon. Still have to do a little finishing before it gets here.

Gene


Gene, that disker cut 15 feet and it was not uncommon to see two of them hitched together behind a bigger tractor to cut 30 feet. You could also get an 18 foot version. They were the last diskers Massey made.
Got a newer video of the Mercury adventures from yesterday. I was not getting enough cranking speed out of the old six volt battery so I hooked up a remote 12 volt battery just to the starter and kept the six volt in place for the ignitiion and electrical system. It worked well and produced a lot of smoke.
[video=youtube_share;wO25Y2zgShE]http://youtu.be/wO25Y2zgShE[/video]
Ralph in Sask.

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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2015, 11:33:42 AM »
You're getting her there, Ralph.  The smoke is just the thing to fumigate out any four legged critters who may be living in there.  Of all the flat head V-8's I had back in the day, I only have one left and that is most likely ruined.  It has been upside down in a '46 Ford out in a gully and has most likely been visited by the creek many times.  I do still have a polished aluminum dual intake manifold with one carburetor still on it stashed in the back of my garage.  Probably should think about putting that on Ebay and turning it into cash along with the NOS '46-'48 Ford left rear fender that I have also.

Your videos bring back a lot of memories.  Keep 'em coming.  Looks like your remaining snow on the ground is about the same as we have here.  22F last night and will be cool all week.  Light snow falling this AM.  I am thinking spring will be here be July 4th.

Charlie V

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RG8800

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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2015, 02:39:21 PM »
Quote from: Charlie V;2625
You're getting her there, Ralph.  The smoke is just the thing to fumigate out any four legged critters who may be living in there.  Of all the flat head V-8's I had back in the day, I only have one left and that is most likely ruined.  It has been upside down in a '46 Ford out in a gully and has most likely been visited by the creek many times.  I do still have a polished aluminum dual intake manifold with one carburetor still on it stashed in the back of my garage.  Probably should think about putting that on Ebay and turning it into cash along with the NOS '46-'48 Ford left rear fender that I have also.

Your videos bring back a lot of memories.  Keep 'em coming.  Looks like your remaining snow on the ground is about the same as we have here.  22F last night and will be cool all week.  Light snow falling this AM.  I am thinking spring will be here be July 4th.

Charlie V

Charlie, those Ford parts of yours sound interesting although I think I will do well to just get one carburetor working. I can make some inquiries on http://www.fordbarn.com/forum/ to get some idea what value you might have in those Ford parts. You might be surprised.
Beautiful spring morning here and there is a little more melting going on as you might see in this photo from this morning. I actually got the Merc moving under it's own power. Just needed more transmission fluid.
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2015, 05:11:21 PM »
Ralph, must be a good feeling to get both cars running and moving under their own power. Especially cars with a family history.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]837[/ATTACH],,[ATTACH=CONFIG]838[/ATTACH]

Have had nice pre-spring weather. I started working Saturday by filling along the road access. Then grading and rolling to get it smooth. Still have a wet section in the center that is percolating subsurface water and very soft and mushy. Had stone delivered yesterday and today. 45 tons of #87 stone. Lower section to the road has been graded and rolled and very smooth. Still have to level and roll the upper part. Sure hope it holds up.

Gene

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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2015, 11:01:53 PM »
Charlie, those Ford parts of yours sound interesting although I think I will do well to just get one carburetor working. I can make some inquiries on http://www.fordbarn.com/forum/ to get some idea what value you might have in those Ford parts. You might be surprised.
Beautiful spring morning here and there is a little more melting going on as you might see in this photo from this morning. I actually got the Merc moving under it's own power. Just needed more transmission fluid.[/QUOTE]

That would be fine, Ralph, if you don't mind. About two years ago, a twin to the fender I have was offered on Ebay with a starting bid of $ 500.00 plus shipping.  I thought the seller was reaching pretty far.  It sat with no bids until just before the listing end, then one bid came in for the $ 500.00.  I wouldn't expect to be that lucky but it would be OK.

Charlie

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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2015, 11:10:55 PM »
Gene, the driveway looks good.  My fine crushed stone is about out of sight and I am due for the same treatment.  Probably has been 10 years or more since the last time.

Charlie

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« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2015, 10:23:39 AM »
My barn lot goes back to around 1900 when they moved part of my house to this site from down on the corner of the farm. When we moved here in 1951 it appeared to have been done in parts with rock about ping-pong ball sized then pit-run gravel over it. Much of it was just dirt (usually mud) and really hard to get around at times. I recall as a kid hauling gravel in a ford slip-scoop from gravel bars in the little creek up to the barn lot kind of regular to keep building it up. About 1955 my father hauled in several loads of what they called "U" rock. It was about like a mix of ping-pong balls and tennis balls. We had a hired man at that time and he shoveled it from the truck and covered the whole lot with it about  3" deep. Then it was covered with about 3" of crushed limestone about the size of peach pits. That held well for a long time. Over the years though it is an on-going process to keep the lot solid. I need to have son Scott bring me a few tri-axle loads in now to get it back in shape. I don't recall now what he usually hauls on a load, 15 tons sticks in my head. There are some "nervous" small bridges between the quarry and here...
Scott was having trouble with some soft spots in his driveway, especially the new part. He made a pile of stone the size of a house.
:-)
Then he brought home a backhoe with a narrow bucket and put 4" tile under all of his driveway area and connected it to a nearby field tile I had put in years ago. He hauled away the dirt from the trenches and then filled all of the trenches with the stone and re-stoned the whole thing. No more problems...
It would have cost him a fortune to have had it done but his only cost was for the tile and the stone. Stone is quite cheap here now. Most of the cost is the trucking.

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« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2015, 11:42:16 AM »
Quote from: robinson46176;2631

Then he brought home a backhoe with a narrow bucket and put 4" tile under all of his driveway area and connected it to a nearby field tile I had put in years ago. He hauled away the dirt from the trenches and then filled all of the trenches with the stone and re-stoned the whole thing. No more problems...
It would have cost him a fortune to have had it done but his only cost was for the tile and the stone. Stone is quite cheap here now. Most of the cost is the trucking.

Now that backhoe is something I could really use. My poor old Massey Super 90 and light duty Cancade front end loader does load a lot of sand and gravel here on the farm but one of these days something is going to break. A good construction duty back hoe would be nice to bury the old rock piles too.
I need a little gravel here in the yard right now but too wet to haul any. I couldn't even drive the old 52 Merc more than a few feet the other day without hitting mud and water. Today, first day of spring and light snow is falling in Sask. But its been a great week up til today.
[video=youtube;LzMLwD36KeI]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzMLwD36KeI[/video]
Ralph in Sask.

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« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2015, 09:00:51 PM »
I remember the old Fordomatic transmissions, or as yours is called a Mercomatic. Heavy cast iron beasts. Have rebuilt a few when I worked in my brother's garage. They were pretty common in the 1960's. Easy to work on though.

The trucker that hauled my stone has a Mack tandem with 2 cheater axles and hauls between 22.5 and 23 tons. Really settles the ground when he is loaded. Stone price was $10.50 per ton and hauling was $3.50 per ton So my total bill for 45.23 tons was $664.74. Thought that was a really good price. Even got a $4.42 discount.

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« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2015, 01:26:25 AM »
Gene, any recommendations on what type trans fluid to add or change in the Mercomatic? Searching the talk forums i can't seem to come up with a clear consensus on what to use. Original Ford recommendation was Type A which is no longer availablle having been replaced by Type F. Some say just use Type Dexron. others say do not use Dexron, only use Type F. I have already added some Dexron just to get it to move. Just curious what you think.
Ralph in Sask.